Difference between revisions of "Equal-slices measure"

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(Added "Analogies with Sperner's theorem" section)
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Applying Version 1 to that random subspace we obtain the claim.
 
Applying Version 1 to that random subspace we obtain the claim.
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== Motivation for equal-slices measure ==
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==== Analogies with Sperner's theorem ====
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One indication that the equal-slices measure is a natural measure to consider is that it plays an important role (implicitly or explicitly) in the standard proofs of Sperner's theorem. Recall that Sperner's theorem is the statement that the largest size of any subset <math>\mathcal{A}</math> of <math>[2]^n</math> that does not contain two sets A and B with <math>A\subset B</math> is <math>\binom n{\lfloor n/2\rfloor}</math>, the size of the middle layer (or one of the two middle layers if n is odd). Now the equal-slices measure on <math>[2]^n</math> can be interpreted as follows: choose a random integer m between 0 and n (chosen uniformly) and a random permutation <math>\pi</math> of <math>[n]</math>, and then take the set <math>\{\pi(1),\dots,\pi(m)\}.</math> The probability that this set belongs to <math>\mathcal{A}</math> is the equal-slices measure of <math>\mathcal{A}.</math>
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Now we claim that any set <math>\mathcal{A}</math> of equal-slices measure greater than <math>1/(n+1)</math> contains a pair (A,B) with <math>A\subset B.</math> This is a considerable strengthening of Sperner's theorem, since the largest set with equal-slices measure 1 trivially has size equal to the size of the largest slice. And the proof follows almost instantly from the definition of equal-slices measure, since if the probability that a random initial segment of a random permutation of <math>[n]</math> lies in <math>\mathcal{A}</math> is greater than <math>1/(n+1)</math> then there must be some permutation of <math>[n]</math> with at least two initial segments belonging to <math>\mathcal{A}.</math>
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Thus, Sperner's theorem follows from a combination of the definition of equal-slices measure, a simple averaging argument, and the trivial observation that if you have a subset of the set <math>\{0,1,\dots,n\}</math> of density greater than <math>1/(n+1)</math> then you can find a configuration inside that subset of the form <math>x,x+d</math> with <math>d\ne 0.</math> This last statement can be thought of as "the one-dimensional corners theorem".
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Therefore, it is not completely unreasonable to hope that if we choose a subset of <math>[3]^n</math> that is dense in the equal-slices measure, then it contains a combinatorial line. This would be the two-dimensional analogue of the strong form of Sperner's theorem given by the above proof.
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==== The distribution of a random point in a random combinatorial line ====

Revision as of 18:27, 15 February 2009

The equal-slices measure [math]\mu(A)[/math] of a set [math]A \subset [3]^n[/math] is defined by the formula

[math] \mu(A) := \sum_{(a,b,c) \in \Delta_n} \frac{|A \cap \Gamma_{a,b,c}|}{|\Gamma_{a,b,c}|}[/math]

where [math]\Delta_n := \{ (a,b,c) \in {\Bbb Z}_+^3: a+b+c=n\}[/math] is the triangular grid and [math]\Gamma_{a,b,c} \subset [3]^n[/math] is the set of slices with exactly a 1s, b 2s, and c 3s. Thus every slice [math]\Gamma_{a,b,c}[/math] has measure 1 (hence the name equal-slices), and the entire cube has measure [math]\frac{(n+1)(n+2)}{2}[/math]. Dividing the equal slices measure by [math]\frac{(n+1)(n+2)}{2}[/math] gives the equal-slices density.

Example: in [math]{}[3]^2[/math], the diagonal points 11, 22, 33 each have equal-slices measure 1 (and equal-slices density 1/6), whereas the other six off-diagonal points have equal-slices measure 1/2 (and equal-slices density 1/12). The total equal-slices measure of [math]{}[3]^2[/math] is 6 (and the equal-slices density is of course 1).

There is a probabilistic interpretation of the equal-slices density of a set [math]A[/math]. Randomly shuffle the [math]n[/math] indices, and then randomly pick [math](a,b,c) \in \Delta_n[/math]. The probability that the string [math]0^a 1^b 2^c[/math] lies in the shuffled version of [math]A[/math] is the equal-slices density of [math]A[/math].

The LYM inequality asserts that any line-free subset of [math][2]^n[/math] has equal-slices measure at most 1. The analogue of this for k=3 is the hyper-optimistic conjecture.

The DHJ(3) conjecture,

DHJ(3), Version 1. For every [math]\delta \gt 0[/math] there exists n such that every subset [math]A \subset [3]^n[/math] of density at least [math]\delta[/math] contains a combinatorial line.

is equivalent to an equal slices version:

DHJ(3), Version 3. For every [math]\delta \gt 0[/math] there exists n such that every subset [math]A \subset [3]^n[/math] of equal-slices density at least [math]\delta[/math] contains a combinatorial line.

Version 3 implies Version 1

Suppose that A has density [math]\geq \delta[/math] in the usual sense. Let m be such that every subset of [math][3]^m[/math] of equal-slices density [math]\geq \delta/2[/math] contains a combinatorial line. Now randomly embed [math][3]^m[/math] into [math][3]^n[/math] by choosing m variable coordinates and fixing the rest. We may suppose that every point in A has [math]n/3+O(\sqrt{n})[/math] of each coordinate value and that [math]m \ll \sqrt{n}[/math]. Therefore, changing coordinates hardly changes the density of a slice. It follows that each point of is in approximately the same number of these random subspaces. Therefore, by averaging, there is a random subspace inside which has equal-slices-density at least [math]\geq \delta/2[/math], and we are done. (We could think of it Terry’s way: as we move the random subspace around, what we effectively have is a bunch of random variables, each with mean approximately [math]\delta[/math], so by linearity of expectation we’ll get equal-slices-density at least [math]\delta/2[/math] at some point, whatever the measure is.)

Version 1 implies Version 3

Suppose that A has density [math]\geq \delta[/math] in the equal-slices sense. By the first moment method, this means that A has density [math]\gg \delta[/math] on [math]\gg \delta[/math] on the slices.

Let m be a medium integer (much bigger than [math]1/\delta[/math], much less than n).

Pick (a, b, c) at random that add up to n-m. By the first moment method, we see that with probability [math]\gg \delta[/math], A will have density on [math]\gg \delta[/math] the of the slices [math]\Gamma_{a',b',c'}[/math] with [math]a' = a + m/3 + O(\sqrt{m})[/math], [math]c' = c + m/3 + O(\sqrt{m})[/math], [math]c' = c + m/3 + O(\sqrt{m})[/math].

This implies that A has expected density on a random m-dimensional subspace generated by a 1s, b 2s, c 3s, and m independent wildcards.

Applying Version 1 to that random subspace we obtain the claim.

Motivation for equal-slices measure

Analogies with Sperner's theorem

One indication that the equal-slices measure is a natural measure to consider is that it plays an important role (implicitly or explicitly) in the standard proofs of Sperner's theorem. Recall that Sperner's theorem is the statement that the largest size of any subset [math]\mathcal{A}[/math] of [math][2]^n[/math] that does not contain two sets A and B with [math]A\subset B[/math] is [math]\binom n{\lfloor n/2\rfloor}[/math], the size of the middle layer (or one of the two middle layers if n is odd). Now the equal-slices measure on [math][2]^n[/math] can be interpreted as follows: choose a random integer m between 0 and n (chosen uniformly) and a random permutation [math]\pi[/math] of [math][n][/math], and then take the set [math]\{\pi(1),\dots,\pi(m)\}.[/math] The probability that this set belongs to [math]\mathcal{A}[/math] is the equal-slices measure of [math]\mathcal{A}.[/math]

Now we claim that any set [math]\mathcal{A}[/math] of equal-slices measure greater than [math]1/(n+1)[/math] contains a pair (A,B) with [math]A\subset B.[/math] This is a considerable strengthening of Sperner's theorem, since the largest set with equal-slices measure 1 trivially has size equal to the size of the largest slice. And the proof follows almost instantly from the definition of equal-slices measure, since if the probability that a random initial segment of a random permutation of [math][n][/math] lies in [math]\mathcal{A}[/math] is greater than [math]1/(n+1)[/math] then there must be some permutation of [math][n][/math] with at least two initial segments belonging to [math]\mathcal{A}.[/math]

Thus, Sperner's theorem follows from a combination of the definition of equal-slices measure, a simple averaging argument, and the trivial observation that if you have a subset of the set [math]\{0,1,\dots,n\}[/math] of density greater than [math]1/(n+1)[/math] then you can find a configuration inside that subset of the form [math]x,x+d[/math] with [math]d\ne 0.[/math] This last statement can be thought of as "the one-dimensional corners theorem".

Therefore, it is not completely unreasonable to hope that if we choose a subset of [math][3]^n[/math] that is dense in the equal-slices measure, then it contains a combinatorial line. This would be the two-dimensional analogue of the strong form of Sperner's theorem given by the above proof.

The distribution of a random point in a random combinatorial line